Perspectives on the Role of Practical Fighting in Chinese Martial Arts, Part 3

26 Feb

nybestkickboxing:

Re posting this one

Originally posted on nysanda:

“You Keep Using That Word,
I Do Not Think It Means What You Think It Means”

This is part of my continuing series of articles discussing the practical training and application of Chinese martial arts. While their intent is not to insult, they are indeed intended to make the reader reexamine what they practice and how they practice it.

In conversations involving martial artists all you have to do is bring up boxing, kickboxing, Muay Thai (Thai boxing), wrestling or mixed martial arts and the inevitable response will always be “those are sports.” In most cases, when a martial artist uses the term “sport” it is in a pejorative connotation. Some explanations are just silly. Others have more thought out responses; that they have a referee, rules regarding what can and can not be done, “safe” venues, no weapons, etc. My initial response to all of these is usually the…

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Use truth as your path…

23 Feb

People who know me from the internet tend to think of me as that somewhat abrasive guy who does nothing but talk about fighting. I certainly talk a lot about fighting, and I’ve trained a lot of people to fight in various combat sports. But in a school that has around a thousand members, these competitive athletes are less than 5% of the population. And that was true even when I was at the height of my fighter training career.

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Every day, six days a week, I teach classes and train the majority of my student body. Most of them don’t have any interest in competitive fighting, many don’t even want to do contact at all. By far, the vast majority of my time is spent helping people achieve their goals; both physical and mental. I help people to be healthier, to look better and most importantly to feel better. Feeling better is both a physical state and a mental state. I am a firm believer, what is the point of having a strong body but a weak mind?

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The point I am going to make with today’s blog is that I use the same methods and philosophy to train both my athletes and my so called “normal students.” Reality is, LIFE IS A FIGHT. You have to be prepared for resistance, you have to overcome obstacles, you have to work hard and you have to face your fears and your self doubt. I said this in the clip below;

Integrally related to this is the concept that the ONLY WAY to do this all is to do it with truth. A responsible coach doesn’t put an athlete in a match without the proper preparation. A responsible coach doesn’t lead an athlete to think they are better than they really are. Certainly a responsible coach wouldn’t teach fake skills to an athlete and thus set them up for a beating in a match. As in all things, truth is always the correct path and you should always do the right thing.

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Unfortunately, all too often in the martial arts community I see quite the opposite. We talk a lot about personal development, developing values, being better people. Then instructors try to teach things they aren’t qualified to teach. They teach watered down or just plain fake “skills” to people. Rather than being honest with their students, challenging them to make REAL EFFORTS, and as their coach being there and being accountable for being part of the process; they have found it easier to lie to them, to give fake praise, and to puff up their egos.

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I can tell you from years of experience, the path of truth WORKS. It’s a simple concept, but simple doesn’t mean easy. It’s not easy, it’s difficult. But anything worth having is worth the effort to attain it.

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Eight pillars to success…

22 Feb

A cold rain fell onto me as I stood on the sidewalk, watching the contents of my martial arts school being loaded into a moving van. It was December 2009, and after twenty years of teaching, my school was for the first time just closed. I’d trained thousands of students, including fighters who had held world titles. I’d been the adopted disciple of a world famous teacher, traveling with him and sharing his exclusive circle of friends. I’d published articles, created instructional DVD’s, been featured on national television. But at that moment, it all seemed to be over. We weren’t moving. The contents were simply going to a storage facility on the west side of Manhattan.

My landlord ripped the building down around me to get me to leave.

My landlord ripped the building down around me to get me to leave.

My wife helped me load a few more personal items into a rented car. She initiated a conversation, asking me “so are you going to teach on Monday?” Then she abruptly stopped, aware that I didn’t have an answer. I had no idea what I was going to do. I was also over $100,000 in debt at the time. But 2009 will forever remain in my mind for yet another reason, we had lost a child. 2009 was the year I seriously considered killing myself.

Pretty serious stuff, yet I sit here today writing this. Just three years later, I received a plague from an industry body congratulating me for having one of the top performing schools in the country. I also added a number of new victories in combat sports and yet another MMA championship title to my school’s list of accomplishments. Today, I actually have the largest and most successful school I’ve ever had. I am also out of debt and quite happy with my life.

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In retrospect, this had not been the first challenge in my life. It wasn’t even the most serious. At the age of six, I had been diagnosed with Leukemia. Of course, I didn’t know this at the time, but 50% of the children diagnosed with Leukemia at that time died. My father, a medical doctor, knew this and when I was adult I would hear about how my father had gone to my grandparents’ house to cry and throw things. Those children that survived weren’t exactly expected to lead a normal life either. The chemotherapy and radiation treatments resulted in nerve damage. I am medically not supposed to be able to lift my knee above the height of my waist. Fortunately, no one told me this, so I never knew I was doing the “impossible.”

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I came to a conclusion a while ago, it is how you decide to tell your story. I could give you this laundry list of bad luck and tragedy and leave it there for you to sympathize with me. Or I could continue the story and inform you that I overcame each and every one of these challenges and came back better, stronger and more focused. My childhood illness was just the beginning of my journey. It was the inspiration for my worldview, which I want to share with the world.

MORE TO COME

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My dream and my vision

22 Feb

Full disclosure and absolute honesty, even brutal honesty. That is the way I do things. I’ve been doing martial arts almost my entire life, and I’ve been a teacher almost my entire adult life. But I wasn’t much of a business man, in some respects a pretty terrible one actually, until I started listening to Michael Parrella (http://www.mikeparrella.com) in 2009. Through Michael, I also met Bedros Keuilian (http://www.keuilian.com/), who has also been very influential upon me. I consider myself a very lucky person, and I have placed direct links to them so they not only get credit, but so you too can seek out their guidance.

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Today, I run what would be considered a successful martial arts school. It is a nice complement to my many years of developing ways to teach real martial arts to average people, my success training fighters and my efforts to publish historically accurate information on the martial arts in general. I’m a very lucky person. I should be thankful every day for what I have and to those who helped me have this life.

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This weekend, I attended Michael’s “MABS 2015.” That is short for martial arts business summit (https://www.martialartsbusinesssummit.com/). I have been very vocal about the fact that I avoid the traditional martial arts industry events like the plague. I have stated many times that I find much of what is passed off in those events utter crap, or to quote Michael himself “same shit in a different box.”

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So it shouldn’t really be a surprise I go to Michael’s events, except when you consider that I’ve been exposed to Michael’s wisdom for almost six years now. Sure, there are often new speakers at these events, but CLEARLY there are times when material being presented I already have heard, implemented and understand. BUT THERE ARE ENTIRELY DIFFERENT REASONS I GO TO THESE EVENTS.

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These events always re focus me. They charge me up. They fire me up. I sometimes feel like an old clock, at times I need to be wound up again. Another thing they most definitely do is help me focus my dream and my vision.

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I’ve taught thousands of students since 1988. I’ve taught hundreds of seminars. I have instructional DVD’s. I recently published my first book (https://www.createspace.com/4891253). I’ve had an internet presence for over a decade. On this blog, my former blog, internet forums, etc I’ve shared many of my views and beliefs. BUT THIS WEEKEND I REALIZED THAT I HAD YET TO MAKE ONE, UNIFIED STATEMENT OF MY DREAM AND MY VISION. And that is what precisely this weekend hammered at me.

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In the past, I’ve fallen victim to the myth of “perfect action.” I’ve had big ideas that weren’t focused and projects that weren’t thought completely through. I’ve also changed my opinions on things over the years. In summary, I am as human as anyone. So I am NOT promising something specific just yet, other than to say the next few blogs here will be a clear, concise and UNIFIED statement of my dream and my vision. I hope you will tune in, and I hope I can perhaps inspire you just as I have been inspired by others.

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Advice on how not to be “that guy”

16 Feb

This is just some friendly advice on how not to be “that guy” when you enter a martial arts school. Hey! It IS a free country, and you CAN do what you want, but I’m telling you things are probably not how you perceive them to be.

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— Don’t be a nuisance. Don’t show up an hour early or without an appointment. And if you do, don’t expect an instructor who is teaching class to ignore his class to chat with you or amuse you. Don’t just walk onto a training floor, or pick up something, or start hitting a bag. —

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— Don’t lie and don’t exaggerate. Don’t go on about ALL that martial arts training you’ve had, unless it is true. Nothing is more amusing for an instructor than watching the big mouth now struggle through the warm up, have no clue how to execute the basic techniques and/or getting punched in the face by the newbie. You’ll forever be branded a clown (rightfully so) and even if you join, no one will ever take you seriously. —

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— Don’t walk into a martial arts school and say you don’t want to take classes, you just want to hit a bag. If you just want to hit a bag, get a bag and hang it in your basement. BUT you’ll end up looking like the guy in the clip below. —

— Don’t walk in wearing every piece of cliche martial arts clothing known to man, especially don’t wear stuff from another martial arts school. Honestly, if you are so in love with the school across town you should stay there. —

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— Don’t tell the instructor you are training somewhere else and just want to learn some stuff from him but not be a real member. First of all, if that is what you are really trying to do, YOU ARE A PRICK. Second, if that is what you are really doing, chances are you will be the “green light special”.. and I won’t even explain to you what that means. —

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— Don’t talk about how you want to fight, win titles and be a champion. If you really wanted to do that, you’d shut up, sign up and train hard. Flapping your gums about it is just about the surest indication it is all bullsh-t. —

10 things you probably didn’t know about David Ross of NY San Da

14 Feb

10 things you probably didn’t know about David Ross of New York San Da

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10. I was diagnosed with Leukemia at age six. At that time, only 50% of the children actually survived. Those that did survive, suffered nerve and muscular damage from the chemotherapy and the radiation therapy. According to doctors, I am not supposed to be able to lift my knee any higher than my waist. I spend months in a hospital and had to be home schooled one year. I also survived cancer twice as an adult.

9. I come from a long line of eccentric thinkers. Stanley Kubrick is my paternal grandmother’s cousin. My father’s uncle helped develop sonar and had an all mathematical equation correspondence with Albert Einstein.

8. I speak Guangdonghua (Cantonese), Mandarin and some Shanghai dialect, and can read and write both traditional and simplified Chinese characters. The Guangdonghua was basically self taught. When I met Chan Tai San, he spoke no English and I spoke no Chinese. Stephen Laurette spoke some, but most of it was on the job training.

7. My father didn’t want to sign me up for martial arts lessons and my mother wanted to put me in the closes school, a karate school run by Alex Sternberg. However I had dome some reading and had found Pong Ki Kim’s school. It was a train ride away, but I insisted. My parents only signed me up for the yellow belt program, but I went every day and eventually they signed me up for a year.

6. I have a master’s degree in Chinese history from the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. I also have 60 credits and “ABD” (All But Dissertation) towards a PhD at City University in American history. I taught both Chinese and American history at several universities.

5. I neither practiced martial arts nor taught it for two years, after having an argument with Chan Tai-San and as I went to graduate school. I started practicing again when I saw a flyer at GWU for an informal Jeet Kune Do/Muay Thai sparring group.

4. I have published more than 50 articles on the martial arts in both the martial arts industry press and in academic journals. Many of these articles have been translated into foreign languages and re-distributed. This wide distribution of my articles also means that there has been a wide distribution of a few of my errors, including the correct name of the monastery Chan Tai San was raised in.

3. I initially didn’t want to even meet Chan Tai-San. When I did agree, I thought I would learn a few “pretty forms” since I didn’t know many forms at the time. Ironic.

2. I was never a natural at anything I learned. It literally took me ten years to learn how to do a side kick correctly. In fact, I think the fact I had to work so hard for all my skills is a major reason I am a good coach. I learned to break things down and how to conceptualize them.

1. I never wanted to be a martial arts teacher. Despite having taught people since age 16, I initially thought I was going to be a doctor. At 17, my Taekwondo teacher wanted me to run his second school, I laughed and told him I was going to college! Chan Tai-San asked me when I was going to open a full time school and I told him I wasn’t. He asked me if I was going to throw away everything he taught me. I went to graduate school. Life isn’t always the way you think it is….

Meet the new disciple, same as the old disciple (don’t get fooled again)

4 Jan

I am one of the senior disciples of the late Chan Tai-San. I spent 16 years training with him, was adopted in the formal “baai si” ceremony, taught his “public classes” for the first four years and was his main translator when he traveled the country. I met Chan Tai-San in 1986. If you don’t believe me, you could look at what Chan Tai San wrote in his own handwriting.

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You can also see my Baai Si “red book”. Anyone who claims they were adopted in Baai Si should be able to show you a copy of one of these. They should also tell you who their witnesses were. One of my witnesses was the well known Hung Ga master Frank Yee (Yee Chi Wai).

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baai si page one
last page of red book

Maybe hand written letters and/or foreign languages isn’t your style. Maybe you can’t read Chinese. The other thing I have going for me is the instructor’s certificate that the North American Chinese Martial Arts Federation (NACMAF) gave me after they asked Chan Tai-San to verify I was in fact what I said I was. It was issued in 1994 and says I had eight years of training with Chan Tai-San.

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Anyone who trained with Chan Tai-San prior to 1990 trained either on Henry Street or at the Chan Family Association. The Henry street location burned down.

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Above is a picture of the Chan Family Association which had a Mo Gwoon on the top floor.

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Above is a picture of Chan Tai-San with Stephan Laurette (who introduced me to Chan Tai San), “Gil” who was a student at Hong Luck in Toronto and was there to visit, Steve Ventura and myself. The last guy is named Juan. If anyone ever tells you they trained with Chan Tai San prior to 1990, ask them to show you pictures of the Chan Family Association.

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In the October 1989 issue of Inside Kung Fu Magazine, Laurette and I co-authored an article on Chan Tai-San and his lineage of Lama Pai. This is just a time frame issue, but you’ll notice that only Vetura, Laurette and myself are listed. People like Michael Parella, Stephen Innocenzi and Chris Jurak of course appeared in later articles and are legitimate Chan Tai San disciples. But as a matter of fact, they all joined the group after 1989.

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In order to write the 1989 article, Laurrette and I had to ask Chan Tai-San all sorts of things. We wanted to know WHERE he had studied. So he wrote the name of the monastery in the dirt with a stick. Chinese isn’t easy, especially for foreigners teaching themselves! We mis-read the character as “green” but it was a mistake and we figured it out later looking at the MANY things Chan Tai San later wrote like the writing above. There never was any “green cloud” it was always “clear cloud” and we have hundreds of examples of Chan Tai San’s writing as evidence of this.

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Chan Tai San did NOT teach beginners. This is what the public classes were for. The public classes were held on Lafayette street and there are a large number of photos taken at that location. I was the chief instructor of the public classes so people who wanted to train with Chan Tai-San first became my student and if they passed muster then were accepted by Chan Tai-San.

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In the 1990’s there were over 50 articles about Chan Tai-San and Lama Pai published in various martial arts magazines. Almost all of them were written by me and I appear in them. However, you will note that when Chan Tai San was given the “cover story” for Inside Kung Fu, Stephen Innocenzi co-wrote that piece with me.

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I can tell you who studied with Chan Tai-San directly, and who didn’t. I can tell you what they learned and how well they learned it. One obvious point is that Chan Tai San SPOKE NO ENGLISH. So anyone who starts telling you Chan Tai San stories had better have a pretty good conversational Cantonese.

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For a very long time, I have been interested only in my version of Chan Tai San’s teachings and in teaching the way I wanted to. However, with the growing amount of crap and lies being put out there, it was time to correct all this.

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2014 in review

30 Dec

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here's an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 30,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 11 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Failure to plan is planning for failure…

11 Dec

Failure to plan is planning for failure. Or, as a popular wrestling saying goes, proper preparation precludes poor performance. Of course, the following is just my opinion; but it is the opinion of someone who has been teaching 25 years and training fighters for 20 years. I also would say that my program has provided both benefits and real skills to even non-competitive students over the years. These are the things I believe a real program should entail.

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Conditioning

Proper conditioning is the foundation of not only martial arts, but life itself. I am consistently amazed how some martial arts schools not only don’t provide proper conditioning, but even shy away from it, afraid it will scare off students. One of the most tangible benefits of martial arts training is improved health.

Boxing structure

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I use the term “boxing structure” in a more liberal sense. I don’t mean only western boxing techniques, but I mean first learning hand techniques. We are much more comfortable, indeed we have natural developmental pathways for using our hands. I introduce stance and the proper mechanics of power generation in a set framework. For beginners, having a few basics rules they can refer to. Students learn the basic strikes, and then learn the defenses.

Footwork and movement

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The cliche is in fact true; footwork is both the most basic and the most advanced aspect of martial arts. Since I have established an existing framework with the boxing structure, my footwork is pinned to this. Students learn to move to close the distance, evade, set up angles of attack, to slip, to duck and to set up shooting.

Kicking

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People are not used to using their legs in the same manner they use their legs. There is no natural developmental pathway. For this reason, learning to use the legs is a longer, and at times uncomfortable, process. An instructor should always keep that in mind.

Clinching (standing grappling)

In my opinion, standing grappling is the most important and varied, but most frequently ignored aspect of martial arts training. For self defense, it is the most essential. No matter what, you will end up in a clinch in a real fight. I have broken down the clinch/standing grappling as such;

– hand fighting
– body clinching
– neck clinching
– arm clinching
– entries
– escapes
– striking
– takedowns / throws
– defenses against takedowns / throws
– standing submissions

I have 25 years experience structuring programs and teaching classes. If you are a school owner or instructor and need help, I am available for consult at INFO@nysanda.com

GO TRAIN!
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Training with Equipment

9 Dec

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The heavy bag
The heavy bag is the most basic piece of training equipment. Its primary use is to allow the student to practice their striking and kicking techniques at full power and to become accustomed to the impact. However, when properly utilized, the bag can also be used to teach distance, timing and footwork. The following points should be kept in mind when practicing;

 Don’t stand square in front of the heavy bag. Use your fighting stance, keeping one shoulder in front of the other.

 Don’t stand in place in front of the heavy bag. Move in both directions around the bag.

 Since you do not have to worry about injuring a partner, use full speed and power.

 Picture the heavy bag as an actual opponent with arms and legs. Identify actual anatomical targets on the bag.

 The most effective fighters visualize oncoming attacks and defend as well as launching attacks.

Muay Thai pads
Muay Thai pads are strapped to the trainer’s forearms and allow the student to practice both striking and kicking techniques in combination while developing focus, accuracy, distance, reaction time and footwork. The trainer may also use shin-n-instep guards and various kinds of body armor that will allow even more variety in the types of techniques being practiced. With the exception of actual free sparring, working with the forearm pads is the most realistic practice a student can engage in.

After an initial period of learning how to hold the pads and getting familiar with the format, it is time to start interactive pad work. In addition to holding the pads for the student to attack, the person holding the pads will also attack so that defense is incorporated into the training.

Leg Kick Shield
1. Jab, right round kick (leg)
2. Jab, right round kick (leg), cross
3. Cross, right round kick (leg) (“double wind”)
4. Foot jab
5. Foot jab, thrust kick
6. Foot jab, right round kick (leg)
7. Right low kick, sprawl
8. Skip knees
9. Foot jab, thrust kick, side kick, back kick
10. Foot jab, side kick, back kick


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