Beyond the basics, there must be variety

24 Jan

An instructor must keep a close eye and a direct hand on the training of students. It is easy to fall into a set pattern, but such patterns mean the student will not have have well rounded training, will not learn the entire system and most importantly will not have the proper live training to apply the techniques.

A student learns a technique in isolation, then with resistance (on equipment such as a heavy bag or a pad), and then with a partner they learn the defense(s). Once the basic defenses are learned, it’s an instructor’s responsibility to constantly break down and rearrange the techniques into different combinations.

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A proper defense drill not only introduces the technical defense, it also conditions the student for the reality of fighting. It must condition the student to become familiar with contact. Begin with very limited and simple drills; I have a drill I call “four shields” which begins the process of learning to get hit.

Basic drills progress to more free form drills, approaching sparring. We call these “survival drills”

Parrying, shielding, slipping and ducking will progressively lead to clinching and/or “shooting” (takedowns involving seizing the legs). In particular, the shielding drills lead well into both neck and body clinching and these methods are extremely functional methods of defending against a better striker.

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However, I believe equally in the importance of footwork as a form of defense. Be careful not to stress clinching to the exclusion of evasive footwork. Evasive footwork is also an excellent defense against those trying to clinch.

* ESSENTIAL RULES FOR DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK
– Never move backward in a straight line, use lateral movement
– Do not “run away”, stay in range to counter
– Move to your right against an orthodox fighter
– Move to your left against a “south paw”

Let’s examine the most basic boxing drill; parry vs. jab.

First, make sure the structure is correct. Both students have to be in the correct stance, the correct execution of the jab, the correct execution of the block, etc.

Second, the drill must be done with movement; you don’t fight standing still so don’t drill that way.

Third, even though this is a partner drill there is impact; the punch is thrown to actually connect and is actually blocked.

Fourth, all the basic drills will eventually be practiced with appropriate counters so that the students are used to the resistance (counter attack) of a real opponent.

Fifth, introduce every drill within context. Explain both why the technique is used and when it is used.

It is important to understand that all drills have “two sides”. Doing parry vs. jab isn’t just about defense. Every jab needs to be thrown correctly, i.e. you are practicing your jab as well. Of course, drills are not sparring and there is NO EGO. Never injure your partner doing drills.

NOW GO TRAIN!
SIFU
www.NYBestKickboxing.com

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